Pressure Vessels

Each pressure vessel that we manufacture is per the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code. As a leading ASME pressure vessels manufacturer, our specialty lies in working with a variety of alloys, pressures, & designs to meet your custom requirements. More »

Weld Overlay and Clad Vessels

Our weld overlay and clad vessels are fully code-compliant. We use our advanced welding techniques to their full capabilities to offer you the finest overlay/clad components and pressure vessels. More »

High Pressure Vessels

We hold the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) U, U2, and U3 stamps, and have the capabilities and resources to manufacture ASME high pressure vessel to your exacting specifications. More »

Autoclaves

We hold the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) U, U2, U3, PP, & S stamps, and have the capabilities and resources to manufacture autoclaves to your exacting specifications. More »

Heat Exchangers

We specialize in the design, engineering, and fabrication of Shell and Tube Heat Exchangers, including thermal calculations. All of our units are built in strict accordance with the latest edition and addenda of the A.S.M.E. Code, Section VIII Division 1, 2, or 3 and T.E.M.A.” More »

 

How Heat Exchangers Work in a Nuclear Reactor

Heat exchangers are used to transfer heat from one medium to another. Generally, this medium is liquid or gas. They use the process of conduction to carry out this transfer. These processes are governed by thermal equilibrium.

Understanding How Heat Exchangers Work

  • Objective: The main objective of a heat exchanger is to gradually reduce the temperature of an object.
  • Vessel Construction: A heat exchanger consists of two liquids that are separated by a wall. The wall is thermally conductive. There is a provision to transfer the heat of the hot object to one of the liquids. The liquids are in constant movement to allow for effective heat transfer.
  • Process: The heat is transferred from the hot object to the liquid in one of the chambers. This liquid is in constant rotation, which allows the heat to quickly yet gradually dissipate. It is then transferred through the wall to the liquid in the next partition. This helps cool down the object slowly.

Understanding How Heat Exchangers Work in a Nuclear Reactor

A nuclear reactor consists of uranium among other materials. Thermal energy is a by-product of most of the reactions taking place in the reactor. The heat produced is so high that it could cause disastrous problems. Hence, a heat exchanger is used to cool down the reactor in stages. Generally, water or liquefied sodium is used to cool down the nuclear reactor.

Application Example:

Let us assume the liquid used is water.

The heat from the reactor is first transferred to the water. Due to the large amount of heat transferred, the water turns to steam. The steam is then transferred via a pump to a heat exchanger. The steam is used to move a turbine, which generates electric current. In the process, steam cools down and converts to water. The cool water is transferred back to the reactor. This cycle keeps on repeating to cool the reactor.

Heat exchangers are used across several industries. Many applications require a heated liquid or gas. In such cases, they use the heat generated from an application to transfer heat to the one that needs it. Basically, this process occurs to facilitate transfer of heat from a vessel that needs to cool down to a liquid that needs to be heated. This symbiotic method of heat transfer saves companies unnecessary costs, in terms of material, power, and labor.

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